What You Can Do to Protect Honeybees

Many people don’t know just how important honey bees are. They are not just here to provide the sweet taste of honey that so many people enjoy and love; they play a very important role in our ecosystem. There are nearly 1,000 plants that are grown for beverages, spices, food, fibers and medicines that need to be pollinated for the finished product to be produced. Honey bees play a vital role in the pollination process for many of these plants and without them we wouldn’t have the products we need. A lot of the fruits and other foods that we consume on a daily basis are here because of honey bees and the pollination process they provide. Could you imagine your local grocery store without apples, magos, Kiwis, plums, onions, strawberry’s?? We must make it our duty to protect honey bees. There are a few key things that we can do to help protect them.   Plant your garden with bee friendly plants: When honey bees can’t find crops that they can pollinate from, they look for and rely on garden flowers to get their pollen and nectar. If you plant single flowering plants and vegetables in your garden, honey bees are able to pollinate from them and get what they need in their diet. Things that are honey bee friendly that you can put in your garden include: hollyhocks, sunflowers, flowering herbs, mint, foxgloves, lime trees, willow trees, and bean plants are all good for honey bees. Protect any swarms you may see: If you happen to see a swarm of honey bees coming together as a colony,...

How to Avoid Termites – Part TWO

We’ve discussed termites. Now, it’s time to discuss part TWO! Read more about how to avoid termites. A termite infestation is an expensive problem. Termite infestation will cause structural damage and cosmetic damage. As a ground warms in the spring and summer months, your home may be at risk for termites. Many homeowners mistake swarmers for flying ants, with the first sign of infestation being discarded wings near windowsills. Your home may be at risk if you live in a temperate or warm region, and if your property is located in a region that has the propensity to have termite problems. Termites have a special enzyme that consists of a mixture of bacteria and protozoa that allow it to digest the cellulose of wood. A single termite is not much of a problem – it will take more than 3,000 years for a single termite to eat a 1000 square foot home. However, termites do not work alone, with termite colonies consisting of hundreds and even thousands of individual termites in an advanced infestation. These colonies can eat about a pound of wood per day. Even though this may not seem like a lot, the problem is that extracting a termite infestation can be extensive as they are hardy insects that can live for several years, with the queen easily living to be 50 years old. The damage tends to add up over time, destroying the structure and foundation of a home. Preventing Termites – Termite Control Treat the structure of the home as it’s being built. A pretreatment can help circumvent termite infestation, especially if you live in a...

How to Avoid Yellow Jackets

You Need to Avoid Yellow Jackets There are a number of reasons you need to avoid yellow jackets. For starters, yellow jackets have a vicious bite as well as a smooth sting that will not catch in the flesh of their victims, meaning that even a single insect can sting again and again in a single encounter. Furthermore, yellow jackets tend to come in aggressive swarms, meaning that a single encounter can result in hundreds and hundreds of stings. Although the venom of a single sting should have a limited effect on humans, it is not unknown for sufficient stings to kill, particularly when the victim has an allergic reaction. As a result, if you value your continuing well-being, you need to remain on the lookout for yellow jackets. How Can You Avoid Yellow Jackets? Here are some suggestions that can be used for avoiding yellow jackets: You can reduce your chances of encountering yellow jackets by removing the sources of food that can attract them. For example, if you have a fruit-bearing tree on your property, you want to make sure that all of the fruit is harvested before they become over-ripe, which can attract yellow jackets as well as other foragers. Similarly, if you have garbage cans sitting out on your property, you want to make sure that they are sealed shut so that nothing can get in as well as cleaned out on a regular basis to minimize the temptation for yellow jackets as well as other foragers. The less reason that yellow jackets have to visit your property, the smaller your chances of encountering them....

Rat Entry Sizes

Rats could very easily be labeled the masters of breaking and entering. If there’s a way to get into your house or other buildings, they’ll find it. Since they have the will to do so, you need to stop the ways they can get in. The interesting thing about rats is that they can contort themselves enough to fit through a hole the diameter of a silver dollar—or smaller. If there is a crack in a wall only ½-inch wide, they can gain entrance through it. Here are a few things to understand about how they gained access to your home Why do Rats Choose Houses? The myth is that rats like dirty areas. That’s not necessarily true. They are looking for warm places to nest near food. You may have the cleanest of surroundings, but if there are rats in your neighborhood, you should take precautions. During the summer months, rats may be content living in heavy foliage in your yard. Since rats have young year round, it’s best to be prepared at all times. How They Get In Rats are actually quite agile. They are capable of climbing any rough surface, such as trees or the stucco on your home. They can also maneuver their way into vents or attic louvers. They are also capable of climbing electrical wires or cables—and chewing through them! Wherever there is a small hole, a rat considers it to be an open invitation to come in. Rats do this by flattening and squeezing their bodies to accommodate an opening. How do You Know Rats Are in Your Home? You’ll be able...