10 Fascinating Facts About Bees

Bees are amazing insects. We have relied on bees to pollinate many of our crops and it’s estimated that honey bees pollinate a third of all the food crops consumed by humans. Despite their uniqueness and close association with human beings, there are many facts about the bees that you may not know about. Below are 10 fascinating facts about bees: A Single Colony Can Contain Up To 60,000 Bees Yes, that’s right, one colony can have up to 60,000 bees. They are very organized with each member of the colony playing their specific role. There are construction workers who build beeswax foundation, where the queen bees lay eggs and it’s also the place where workers store honey. Nurse bees are responsible for caring for the young ones. The queen bee also has her attendant workers who feed and bathe her. There are guard bees who keep guard while the undertakers carry away the dead bees from the hive. Foragers are responsible for collecting enough pollen and nectar which is used to feed the whole colony. Worker Honeybees Are All Females All the workers in the hive are females. The males only make up about 15 percent of the population in most colonies. You can recognize males from the stinger. Their only job is to mate, and they don’t even feed themselves. In the fall or at the end of the mating season, the males (also known as drone bees) are kicked out of the hive to avoid drainage of resources and also because they are no longer useful. A Queen Bee Stores A Lifetime Supply of Sperm A...

Interesting Facts About Mice

Mice are some of the most common pests, not just in the US but around the globe. It’s no surprise that most households will eventually have to deal with mice infestation. Mice will try and get into your home to seek shelter and food. You might have some understanding of mice, but here are 10 fascinating mouse facts: Mice Consume A Lot of Food Mice have big appetites despite their small bodies and stomachs. They eat between 15 to 20 times a day and they will stop at several foods areas during the course of their day to eat or carry food. Because of their frequent eating habits, they tend to settle or build their homes near the source of their food. They eat all kinds of grains and fruits from the plants. Their Teeth Never Stop Growing Mice, just like many other rodent species, have incisor teeth that never stop growing. The mice teeth grow at a rate of 0.3mm daily. This is the main reason why they gnaw their teeth on different items like cardboard boxes, furniture, and wires to grind their teeth down to a comfortable length. In some instances, mice have caused electrical fires and other damages as a result of grinding their teeth in electrical wires. Mice Are Excellent Gymnasts Mice have superb gymnastic skills and they are brilliant climbers, jumpers and even swimmers. They can easily jump a foot and climb up with ease onto kitchen counters or pantries to get some food. You should always store your pantries stuff in plastic containers that are hard and close them with tightly sealed lids....

The Lowdown on Fleas

What Do Fleas Look Like? Fleas are wingless parasites with thin and small bodies that are few millimeters long and are brown or reddish-brown in color. Their long back legs are modified for jumping and they can jump as high as 100 times their height from the ground to their host or from one host to another with ease. They only travel by jumping and crawling and don’t ‘fly’ at all even though they might appear as if they’re flying when moving. There are covered with hair in their bodies which make it easy for them to root themselves to their host’s hair or fur and move easily. Flea Lifecycle Fleas have four lifecycle stages and understanding them can also help you to treat and even prevent their infestation in the future. Eggs: Fleas eggs are small and whitish in color. One female flea can lay 50 eggs or more in just one day. The female can lay eggs on the pet and because they’re light, they can fall off in the home environment. Larvae: Eggs become larvae after 2-10 days and feed on the feces of the adult fleas or dead flea larvae. Larvae avoid light and hide into carpets, cracks in hardwood floors, upholstery and under baseboards. The larvae stage lasts for 5-11 days. Pupae: The larvae will then create a cocoon or pupa. It is in the pupa that the larvae mature into an adult. It is not easy to get rid of fleas’ infestation as they are protected from most treatments used on the premises. They are also mostly situated beyond the reach of the sprays and even...

Termite Social Behaviors

Did you know that termites play an essential role in nature? They help in breaking down dead wood and other cellulose materials which is vital in the ecosystem. Termites range in size from 1/8 of an inch to 1 inch long. Their colonies vary in colors from brown to white and black. However, their colors depend on the life stage of a particular termite and their species. The most common behaviors of termites are useful ecologically, they can be a pest in a home or business. Some common behaviors of termites include: Colonies Termites are social insects, and they tend to live together in an organized family structure called territories. One colony can comprise of 100 to 1 million termites, depending on the species. In each colony, there are smaller structures called castes which have different functions in the colony and have their own unique and distinguishable form of characteristics. Further, each termite colony has a king and a queen who are responsible for reproduction. There are three principals in caste which include: The soldiers, workers and the reproductive. Swarming Swarming is the most conspicuous sign of termite behaviors around the homes. Swarming is the process which a new termite colony forms after a queen termite leaves the colony with a large group of workers. About 60% of the workers leave the original location with the queen termite and where they go on to form another colony. The primary purpose of termites swarming is to mate and start new colonies. Colonies of subterranean termites can produce thousands of swarms while other species like dry wood termites produce fewer swarms. Termite species are...

Spider and Spider, Oh My! Signs You Have a Spider Problem

Like insects infestations, spiders’ infestation can be a troubling affair to homeowners. Generally, Spiders are harmless but depending on the person’s sensitivity, they can cause serious angst. Some spiders are actually dangerous and can even cause serious medical complications if the bites are left unattended. It is therefore essential for homeowners to be in a position to identify any signs indicating of spiders’ infestation in their areas for safety purposes. Webs This is one of the most clear ways to identify that you have a spider problem at your premises. The more the spider webs at your residence or your commercial place, the higher chance that you have a spider infestation. In such cases, some spiders create straightforward and elaborate patterns of web networks while others create some complex designs for their homes. Any of these web patterns is enough evidence that you are facing a spider problem at your place and if proper caution to eliminate the spiders is not taken. If you do not deal with the spiders after noticing their existence at your premise, it means that the spiders will have an ample time to develop egg sacs, that when given enough time, will produce baby spiders.  Egg Sacs There are various types of spiders, and most of them lay hundreds of eggs all at once and wrapped in a silk bag. Once you spot sacs of eggs at your residence, you should be aware that within a short period they will hatch. You will then have many more spiders to deal with. Dealing with the egg sacs is much easier than dealing with the spiders...

6 Tips on Keeping Your Attic Free of Pests

Finding out there is the presence of pests in your attic at any time is not something any homeowner wants to see. Besides the associated health complications brought up by pests, the fright of coming face to face with pests like rodents or finding critters around the house is enough to threaten homeowners to call pest control professionals at any hour of the night. Whether you have noticed pests in your ducts or vents in the pasts or you are worried of pest getting into your home during winter, these steps will help you in keeping your attic free of pest long before they become a problem in your house. Seal any possible cracks and gaps in the attic Presence of cracks and gaps on the attic is the most straightforward methods that pests can get their way into the house. Often, damages or cracked vent systems are primary culprits that gives insects, rodents and many other winter pests the freedom to access the warmest area of your room. Regular checks on the exterior of your vent and ducts for any damages is essential to identify cracks, holes, and damages and patch them up. This helps in stopping pests long before they can enter the house. For damages hidden inside the interior walls, it is necessary to call pest management professions who are in a position to repair them or put you in touch with HVAC professionals who will fix the cracks and gaps thus keep your attic free of pests. Ensure regular cleaning and maintenance This is among the most critical steps in keeping your attic free of...