California termites swarms spreading

Head-up California termites warms are spreading. Ask Mariners Pest Control and the 100’s of calls they get a month from cities like, Long Beach, San Diego, Crestline, Hemet, Irvine, Anaheim, Los Angeles and more. If your on the bandwagon of believers in Global Warming, get ready for the rise of the termite army coming to you city. With the increasing changes in rainfall and more hotter temperatures. Termites already account for over $5 billion dollars worth of damage a year in the U.S. alone, and with increasing temperatures that cost is likely to increase to much much more. Termites are drawn to moisture. The good news is that high temperatures may keep California’s termite populations down. Down lay your head down peacefully at night just yet homeowners. termites are still a huge threat to your home. According to Nathan Symons, of Mariners Pest Control, “You still need to be careful. many California homeowners are putting down mulch to conserve water. FYI: Keep mulch away from your foundation. Water gets trapped inside the mulch (rainfall, moisture) and it’s a resort for termites, while they make their way into your home. The warm weather California is experiencing has unusually increased termite swarms. How do we know this? Our phone have lit up with frantic calls of suspected termite invasions.” Says, Mr. Symons. There are three types of termites that are currently active in Southern California —dampwood termites, drywood termites and subterranean termites. Dampwood termites, which require wet or moist wood, can be found anywhere in California, mostly along coastal areas. California having plenty of beach cities is a haven for these...

Termites evolved from cockroaches?

Recent research has determined that termites may have evolved from cockroaches over 170 million years ago, in Africa or Asia. Termites acquired the ability to digest cellulose, the main compound in plant cell walls (and wood), and the most abundant organic molecule on Earth. This ability helped them become one of the most largest growing insect groups. The question is when and where did this evolutionary process begin. Professor Theodore Evans and his team of scientists in the biological sciences department at National University of Singapore have used sequences of mitochondrial genomes, from 48 termite species from all termite families and subfamilies from around the world and to try to determine the timing and locations of this termite evolution. The team created the the best evolutionary tree for termites to date, showing that termites split from cockroaches about 170 million years ago in the mid-Jurassic period. That’s when Pangea, the ancient single continent, was in the process of breaking up. These studies have suggested that termites are 35 million years older than the oldest known fossils. The Termitidae, according to these scientists, evolved about 54 million years ago, most likely in Africa when it was an island (possibly in Southeast Asia). As most subfamilies in the Termitidae have been distributed across the tropics, termites are likely to have dispersed over oceans in floating logs. It is likely most primitive species survived in isolation—such as in Australia for Mastotermes darwiniensis, (Common names giant northern termite and Darwin termite, is a termite species found only in northern Australia. It is a very peculiar insect, the most primitive termite alive. Wikipedia), the most...